Author Interview with Margaret Fieland

Hey gang, in honor of our current 99 cent book sale, I’d like to share an interview with Margaret Fieland, whose novel Relocated is included in the great MuseItUp YA bundle of ebooks along with Wakefield. Without further ado:

brokenbonds_200X300(1) 1. From reading the descriptions for your sci-fi books, it seems like they’re set in the same world but not necessarily a series in the classic sense. If that’s accurate, why the unique take?

Troy, you’re right, I appear to be writing a sequence rather than a classic series. Why? In September of 2010, I decided to write a sci fi novel for NaNo (National Novel Writing Month, which is in November). I did so in order to overcome my phobia about writing science fiction — I was and am a long-time fan — I selected Robert A. Heinlein’s Farmer in the Sky for my tenth birthday — but had never, up til that point, written any.

Along about December, after I’d written the novel, I came across an editing workshop and signed up for it. I eventually ended up submitting the novel, Relocated, to MuseItUp Publishing, and it was published in 2011.

I never planned to write a series, but my characters refused to leave me alone. I wrote Geek Games to answer some questions for myself about what happened to Martin Samuels, one of the secondary characters from Relocated, and Broken Bonds to continue the story of two others, Major Brad Reynolds and Ardaval Namar.

2. The science fiction genre is usually seen as a boy’s club. What have been your experiences as a woman writing sci-fi?

Sci fi is largely a boy’s club, but there were women writing (and very successfully) in the genre even when I was growing up — Andre Norton and CL Moore, to name a couple. Now, of course, there are lots more. Though women tend to write more fantasy than sci fi, there are still a lot of very fine women sci fi writers.

3. If you could have dinner with one author, living or dead, who would it be?

Lewis Carroll. I love the Alice books and really enjoy Carroll’s poetry, When I was in college, I’d reread Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass every exam time. I would forego trips to the library, and then, suffering from book withdrawal, I’d reread Alice. I also taught myself to write backwards and wiggle my ears for the same reason. I taught one of my sons to wiggle his ears when he was in middle school. He and I thought it was a riot — his teacher was less enchanted.

4. How did you get into writing? Was it always a passion or something that came later in life?

I had absolutely no plans to become a writer. I wrote tons of bad poetry as a teen, and continued on into my twenties and beyond. Along about 2005, I wrote a poem I wanted to keep, and this led me a couple of online communities, where I heard about the Muse Online Writers Conference. I ‘met’ Linda Barnett Johnson and joined her writing forums. Linda required everyone to write both poetry and fiction, so, thus prodded, I started to write fiction as well. I started out writing fiction for children, under the mistaken impression it was easier than writing for adults. I ended up getting hooked.

5. Any upcoming projects you’d like to share with us?

I just completed the fourth Aleyne novel, which takes place after Broken Bonds. I’ve started work on a prequel, about the first encounter of Terrans (us) with the Aleyni, and as well I’m working on a fantasy that takes place in a future ice age.

meBio: Born and raised in New York City, Margaret Fieland has been around art and music all her life. Her poems and stories have appeared in journals such as Turbulence Magazine, Front Range Review, and All Rights Reserved. She is one of the Poetic Muselings. Their poetry anthology, Lifelines, was published by Inkspotter Publishing in November, 2011. She is the author of Relocated, Geek Games, and Broken Bonds, published by MuseItUp Publishing , and of Sand in the Desert, a collection of science fiction persona poems. A chapter book is due out later this year.

Blurb for Broken Bonds: Sex with aliens? How about romance with aliens? A treason accusation? Brad Reynolds has his hands full. When Major Brad Reynolds is assigned to head the Terran Federation base on planet Aleyne, the last thing he expects to find is love, and certainly not with one of the alien Aleyni. How can he keep his lover, in the face of political maneuvering and of Ardaval’s feelings for his former partners — and theirs for him?

Buy the Book: Publisher’s Website, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Bookstrand

Find Margaret on the web: Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads

New interview

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For today’s stop on the Wakefield (Mad World, Book One) blog tour, Erin and I were interviewed at Dream Big… Read Often. We discuss research, influences, surprises in the writing process, and much more. Check it out. More reviews and articles coming soon.

YA writing guest post

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Today’s stop on the blog tour is Andi’s Young Adult Books. Erin and I wrote a guest article “On YA Tropes – What’s been done to death, and what can be saved?” We discuss female protagonists, dystopian regimes, and love triangles in young adult fiction. Check it out here.

Check out an interview with me

Wakefield Book CoverToday kicks off a month long book tour for the Mad World series. Over the course of the next thirty days, Wakefield (Mad World, Book One) will be featured on several blogs with a variety of features like book reviews, excerpts, and interviews with Erin and I.

Our first stop in the tour is at Reading Addiction, which features an author meet and greet. Hop on over and check it out now.

Mad World reviews and an interview

Hey all, a wonderful fan from the UK has reviewed Tunnelville (Mad World, Book 2) and interviewed Erin and me. Check out her site A Simple Book Blog From A Simple Reader!

Spoiler alert: she gives Tunnelville 4 out of 5 stars and mentions how much she hates one of our characters (in a good way!)

Here’s an excerpt: “Max, though. Max. I’m not sure about Max. He reminded me a little of a wet fish. I liked his voice and everything, and he interacted well, but he wasn’t as interesting as Astrid. I think its just a preference thing, but I wanted to slap him a few times, but that’s a good thing if you look at it from an optimists point of view, it means he’s lifelike and causes reactions.”